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    • दर्शनीय स्थल भ्रमण (17)

    • The Arch Of Triumph

      Arcul de Triumf is a triumphal arch located in the northern part of Bucharest, on the Kiseleff Road. The first, wooden, triumphal arch was built hurriedly, after Romania gained its independence (1878), so that the victorious troops could march under it. Another arch with concrete skeleton and plaster exterior of elaborate sculptures and decoration designed by Petre Antonescu was built on the same site after World War I in 1922. The arch exterior, which had seriously decayed, was replaced in 1935 by the current much more sober Neoclassical design, more closely modelled in the Arc de Triomphe in Paris. The new arch, also designed by Petre Antonescu and executed in stone, was inaugurated on 1 December 1936. The arch has a height of 27 metres. It has as its foundation a 25 x 11.50 metres rectangle. The sculptures with which the facades are decorated were created by famous Romanian sculptors such as Ion Jalea and Dimitrie Paciurea. Presently, military parades are held beneath the arch each December 1, with the occasion of Romania's national holiday. Elisabeta Palace, the current residence of the Romanian Royal Family, is located near the Arch of Triumph, in Herăstrău Park.

      साइट पर समय: שעה
    • National Military Museum

      The National Military Museum (Romanian: Muzeul Militar Naţional), located at 125-127 Mircea Vulcănescu St., Bucharest, Romania, was established in 1923 by King Ferdinand. It has been at its present site since 1988, in a building finished in 1898.

      साइट पर समय: שעתיים
    • Botanic Garden

      The Bucharest Botanical Garden (Romanian: Grădina Botanică din Bucureşti), now named after its founder, Dimitrie Brândză, is located in the Cotroceni neighbourhood of Bucharest, Romania. It has a surface of 17.5 hectares (including 4,000 m² of greenhouses), and has more than 10,000 species of plants. The first botanical garden in Bucharest was founded in 1860 near the Medicine Faculty by Carol Davila. Its first director was the botanist Ulrich Hoffmann, followed six years later by Dimitrie Grecescu. The garden was eventually moved to its current location in 1884 by Dimitrie Brândză, a Romanian botanist, and Louis Fuchs, a Belgian landscape architect. The gardens were opened in 1891, when the building of the greenhouses finished. The garden was damaged during World War I, when it was used by the German occupation troops, and during World War II when it was hit by Anglo-American bombardments. In the Garden there is a Botanical Museum in a building of the Brâncovenesc style, located near the entrance gate, where more than 5,000 plant species are displayed, including 1,000 exotic plants.

      साइट पर समय: שעתיים
    • Old Princely Court

      Curtea Veche (the Old Princely Court) was built as a palace or residence during the rule of Vlad III Dracula in 1459. Archaeological excavations started in 1953, and now the site is operated by the Muzeul Municipiului Bucuresti in the historic centre of Bucharest, Romania.

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    • King Mihai I Park

      Herăstrău Park (Romanian: Parcul Herăstrău) or King Michael I Park is a large park on the northern side of Bucharest, Romania, around Lake Herăstrău, one of the lakes formed by the Colentina River.

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    • Romanian Athenaeum

      The Romanian Athenaeum (Romanian: Ateneul Român) is a concert hall in the center of Bucharest, Romania and a landmark of the Romanian capital city. Opened in 1888, the ornate, domed, circular building is the city's main concert hall and home of the "George Enescu" Philharmonic and of the George Enescu annual international music festival.

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    • Palace of Parliament

      The Palace of the Parliament (Romanian: Palatul Parlamentului) is the seat of the Parliament of Romania. Located on Dealul Arsenalului in the national capital city of central Bucharest (Sector 5), it is the second largest administrative building in the world after The Pentagon. The Palace has a height of 84 metres (276 ft), an area of 365,000 square metres (3,930,000 sq ft) and a volume of 2,550,000 cubic metres (90,000,000 cu ft). In terms of weight, the Palace of the Parliament is also the heaviest building in the world, weighing in at around 4,098,500,000 kilograms (9.0356×109 lb).A colossal building, designed and supervised by chief architect Anca Petrescu (1949–2013), with a team of approximately 700 architects, constructed over a period of 13 years (1984–97), it was built as a monument for a totalitarian kitsch style of architecture, in Totalitarian and modernist Neoclassical architectural forms and styles, with socialist realism in mind. The Palace was ordered by Nicolae Ceaușescu (1918–1989), the dictator of Communist Romania and the second of two longtime autocrats in power in the country since World War II, during a period in which the personality cult of political worship and adoration was in full force for him and his family. Known for its ornate interior composed of 23 sections, it houses the two houses of the Parliament of Romania: the Senate (Senat) and the Chamber of Deputies (Camera Deputatilor), along with three museums and an international conference center. The several museums hosted inside the Palace are the National Museum of Contemporary Art, the Museum of Communist Totalitarianism (established in 2015) and the Museum of the Palace. Though originally named the House of the Republic when under its long period of construction (Romanian: Casa Republicii), after the Romanian Revolution in December 1989 it became widely known as The People's House (Romanian: Casa Poporului). Due to its impressive endowments, events organized by state institutions and international bodies such as conferences, symposia, and others take place there, but even so about 70% of the building almost four decades later still remains empty.In 1990, Australian business and media magnate Rupert Murdoch wanted to buy the building for US $1 billion, but his bid was rejected. As of 2008, the Palace of the Parliament is valued at €3 billion euros ($3.4 billion), making it also the most expensive administrative building in the world. The cost of heating and electric use and lighting alone exceeds $6 million per year, as much as the total cost for powering a medium-sized city.

      साइट पर समय: שעתיים
    • Revolution Square

      Revolution Square (Romanian: Piața Revoluției) is a square in central Bucharest, on Calea Victoriei. Known as Piața Palatului (Palace Square) until 1989, it was later renamed after the Romanian Revolution in 1989. The former Royal Palace (now the National Museum of Art of Romania), the Athenaeum, the Athénée Palace Hotel, the University of Bucharest Library and the Memorial of Rebirth are located here. The square also houses the building of the former Central Committee of the Romanian Communist Party (from where Nicolae Ceaușescu and his wife fled by helicopter on December 22, 1989). In 1990, the building became the seat of the Senate and since 2006 it houses the Ministry of Interior and Administrative Reform.Prior to 1948, an equestrian statue of King Carol I of Romania stood there. Created in 1930 by the Croatian sculptor Ivan Meštrović, the statue was destroyed in 1948 by the Communists, who never paid damages to the sculptor. In 2005, the Romanian Minister of Culture decided to recreate the destroyed statue from a model that was kept by Meštrović's family. In 2007, the Bucharest City Hall assigned the project to the sculptor Florin Codre, who is going to design an original statue of Carol inspired by Meštrović's model (most consider it a plagiarism).In August 1968 and December 1989, the square was the site of a two mass meetings which represented the apogee and the nadir of Ceaușescu's regime. Ceaușescu's speech of 21 August 1968 marked the highest point in Ceaușescu's popularity, when he openly condemned the invasion of Czechoslovakia and started pursuing a policy of independence from Kremlin. Ceaușescu's final speech, 1989 was meant to emulate the 1968 assembly and presented by the official media as a "spontaneous movement of support for Ceaușescu", erupting in the popular revolt which led to the end of the regime.

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    • Parcul Carol

      Carol Park (Romanian: Parcul Carol) is a public park in Bucharest, Romania, named after King Carol I of Romania. A French garden located in the southern-central area of Bucharest, partly on Filaret hill, originally capable of hosting various exhibitions, it suffered considerable modifications during the communist regime, including a name change to Parcul Libertății (Liberty Park). The park has officially been listed as a historical monument since 2004. Administration of the park is undertaken mostly by the Bucharest City Hall, whereas monuments are in the care of the Ministry of Culture and Religious Affairs.

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    • Arena Națională

      Arena Națională (Romanian pronunciation: [aˈrena nat͡si.oˈnalə], National Arena) is the national stadium of Romania, in the Lia Manoliu National Sports Complex in Bucharest. Opened in 2011, it replaced the former National Stadium. It was built for the Romania national football team, hosting its games as well as the Romanian Cup Final and the Romanian Supercup. The 2012 UEFA Europa League Final was held at the new stadium. This was the first final of a major European football club competition hosted by Romania. UEFA has announced that the UEFA Euro 2020 Finals would be held in multiple cities all over Europe in a pan-European tournament format to mark the sixtieth anniversary of the tournament. On 19 September 2014 Bucharest has won the UEFA Euro 2020 bids and it was decided that the National Arena will host four matches (as part of the 'Standard Package'), consisting of three group stage matches + one round of 16/quarter-final match.

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    • Stavropoleos Monastery Church

      Stavropoleos Monastery (Romanian: Mănăstirea Stavropoleos), also known as Stavropoleos Church (Romanian: Biserica Stavropoleos) during the last century when the monastery was dissolved, is an Eastern Orthodox monastery for nuns in central Bucharest, Romania. Its church is built in Brâncovenesc style. The patrons of the church (the saints to whom the church is dedicated) are St. Archangels Michael and Gabriel. The name Stavropoleos is the genitive case of Stavropolis (Greek, "The city of the Cross"). One of the monastery's constant interests is Byzantine music, expressed through its choir and the largest collection of Byzantine music books in Romania.

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    • Biserica Sfântul Anton

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    • Palatul Primăverii

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    • The Coral Temple

      The Choral Temple (Romanian: Templul Coral) is a synagogue located in Bucharest, Romania. It is a copy of Vienna's Leopoldstadt-Tempelgasse Great Synagogue, which was raised in 1855-1858. It was designed by Enderle and Freiwald and built between 1857 - 1867. The synagogue was devastated by the far-right Legionaries, but was then restored after World War II, in 1945. The main hall was recently refurbished, and re-opened in 2015. It still hosts daily religious services in the small hall, being one of the few active synagogues in the city and in Romania, Address: Str. Sf. Vineri, nr. 9-11

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    • Cișmigiu Park

      The Cișmigiu Gardens or Cișmigiu Park (Romanian: Grădinile Cișmigiu or Parcul Cișmigiu) are a public park near the center of Bucharest, Romania, spanning areas on all sides of an artificial lake. The gardens' creation was an important moment in the history of Bucharest. They form the oldest and, at 16 hectares, the largest park in city's central area. The main entrance is from Regina Elisabeta Boulevard, in front of the City Hall; there is another major entrance at the Știrbei Vodă Street, near the Crețulescu Palace. The southwestern corner of the park is adjacent to the Gheorghe Lazăr High School.

      साइट पर समय: שעתיים
    • Hanul lui Manuc

      Manuc's Inn (Romanian: Hanul lui Manuc, pronounced [ˈhanu(l) luj maˈnuk]) was, until it was recently shut for restoration and refurbishment, the oldest operating hotel building in Bucharest, Romania; it also housed a popular restaurant, several bars, a coffee-house, and (facing the street) several stores and an extensive bar. Its massive, multiply balconied courtyard hosted many performances and fairs and was a popular place for Romanian television crews to shoot folkloric performances. The hotel and restaurant were closed down in 2007 for refurbishment; shops and a bar known both as Cafeaneaua Bucurestilor de Altadata ("Bucharest of Yesteryear" Cafe) and as Festival 39 remained open (though the bar closed in February 2010). The hotel and restaurant are expected to reopen under new management once the restoration and refurbishment are completed. However, there appear to be disagreements between the city government and the owners about the legality of certain modernizations being undertaken.

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    • Sinagoga Eșua Tova

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    • संग्रहालय एवं संस्कृति (4)

    • Antipa Museum

      The Grigore Antipa National Museum of Natural History (Romanian: Muzeul Național de Istorie Naturală "Grigore Antipa") is a Natural History museum, located in Bucharest, Romania. It was originally established as the National Museum of Natural History on 3 November 1834. It was renamed in 1933 after Grigore Antipa, who administered the museum for 51 years.

      साइट पर समय: שעתיים
    • Museum of the Romanian Peasant

      The National Museum of the Romanian Peasant (Romanian: Muzeul Național al Ţăranului Român) is a museum in Bucharest, Romania, with a collection of textiles (especially costumes), icons, ceramics, and other artifacts of Romanian peasant life. One of Europe's leading museums of popular arts and traditions, it was designated "European Museum of the Year" for 1996.Located on Șoseaua Kiseleff, near Piaţa Victoriei, the museum falls under the patronage of the Romanian Ministry of Culture. Its collection includes over 100,000 objects. First founded in 1906 by and originally managed by Alexandru Tzigara-Samurcaş, the museum was reopened February 5, 1990, a mere six weeks after the downfall and execution of Nicolae Ceauşescu. During the Communist era, the building housed a museum representing the country's Communist party; the museum's basement still contains a room devoted to an ironic display of some artifacts from that earlier museum. The building, which uses traditional Romanian architectural features, was built on the former site of the State Mint (Monetăria Statului). Initially intended as a museum of Romanian art, it was designed by Nicolae Ghica-Budești and built between 1912 and 1941. The building is listed as a historic monument by Romania's Ministry of Culture and Religious Affairs.The museum was devastated during the June 1990 Mineriad, due to being confused with the headquarters of the National Peasants' Party. One of the museum's most famous exhibits—originally the work of Tzigara-Samurcaș—is "the house in the house". The house, which originally belonged to peasant Antonie Mogos of Ceauru village in Gorj County. From the first, the house was displayed in a non-naturalistic way: objects that would normally be in the interior were displayed in various manners outside; outbuildings were suggested by fragments. The Communist regime displayed the house much more conventionally, outdoors at the Village Museum; it returned to the Peasant Museum in 2002. The current display at the Peasant Museum revives the original non-naturalistic approach. For example, from a platform, museum visitors may peer into the attic, part of whose wall is stripped away; various objects are arranged inside.In 2002, the museum's exhibit space was greatly expanded as the museum store and offices moved into a new building behind the old one, freeing up a considerable amount of floor space in the museum proper.

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    • Muzeul Satului Dimitrie Gusti

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