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Where do you want to visit in Hong Kong

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    • Victoria Peak

      Victoria Peak (Chinese: 太平山, or previously Chinese: 扯旗山) is a mountain in the western half of Hong Kong Island. It is also known as Mount Austin, and locally as The Peak. With an elevation of 552 m (1,811 ft), it is the highest mountain on Hong Kong island, ranked 31 in terms of elevation in the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (Tai Mo Shan is the highest point in the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region with an elevation of 957 m). The summit is occupied by a radio telecommunications facility and is closed to the public. However, the surrounding area of public parks and high-value residential land is the area that is normally meant by the name The Peak. It is a major tourist attraction that offers views over Central, Victoria Harbour, Lamma Island and the surrounding islands.

      an hour
    • Ocean Park Hong Kong

      Ocean Park Hong Kong, commonly known as Ocean Park, is a marine mammal park, oceanarium, animal theme park and amusement park situated in Wong Chuk Hang and Nam Long Shan in the Southern District of Hong Kong. Opened in 1977 by the then Governor of Hong Kong Sir Murray MacLehose, Ocean Park became popular but by 2005 was unprofitable and widely expected to lose out to the new Hong Kong Disneyland. However, the Park responded with a HK$5.5 billion development plan that saw it expand to over 80 attractions and rides, and steadily grow visitor numbers to 7.6 million in 2014, making it the world's 13th most visited theme park, and the largest theme park in Asia. Half of all visitors now come from mainland China, in growth that parallels rising mainland tourist visitor levels to Hong Kong over the same period. Since this high, visitor numbers have declined to around 6 million in 2016 under the background of declining tourist arrivals in Hong Kong. Covering an area of 91.5 hectares (226 acres), the park is separated by a large mountain into two areas, The Summit (Headland) and The Waterfront (Lowland). These areas can be reached by a 1.5 kilometres (0.93 mi) cable car system, or the Ocean Express funicular railway. To ascend the Headland comprises several hills, visitors can use Hong Kong's second longest outdoor escalator. The theme park has various attractions and rides, including four roller coasters, and also animal exhibits with different themes, such as a giant panda habitat, rainforest and polar displays, as well as an aquarium featuring the world's largest aquarium dome. Between 1979 and 1997, Ocean Park was most famous for its signature killer whale, Miss Hoi Wai (海威小姐). As well as being an amusement park, Ocean Park Hong Kong aims to merge entertainment and education, including conservation advocacy. However it has been criticised by wildlife advocates for practices including the wild capture of large sea animals, such as dolphins and orca, and the presentation of shows featuring such animals performing. Ocean Park is also renowned for holding the largest Halloween events in Asia. In January 2017, the Ocean Park saw a 30% surge in visitors, credited to a new MTR line, big discounts and an early Lunar New Year holiday.

      5 hours
    • Repulse Bay

      Repulse Bay is a bay in the southern part of Hong Kong Island, located in the Southern District, Hong Kong.

      2 hours
    • Ngong Ping 360

      The Ngong Ping 360 is a gondola lift on Lantau Island in Hong Kong. Intended to improve tourism to the area, the aerial lift was previously known as Tung Chung Cable Car Project before acquiring the Ngong Ping 360 brand in April 2005. It consists of the Ngong Ping Cable Car, formerly known as the Ngong Ping 360 Skyrail, and the Ngong Ping Village, a retail and entertainment centre adjacent to the cable car's upper station. Ngong Ping 360 connects Tung Chung, on the north coast of Lantau and itself linked to central Hong Kong by the Tung Chung Line, with the Ngong Ping area in the hills above. This is home to the Po Lin Monastery and the Tian Tan Buddha, both already significant tourist attractions in their own right. Before Ngong Ping 360's opening, the only access was via a mountain road and bus service. Ngong Ping 360 is owned by the MTR Corporation, the operator of Hong Kong's rail system. It was built by Leitner Ropeways and was originally operated by Skyrail-ITM. Skyrail-ITM was removed from the project after an investigation following an incident in June 2007. It is now operated by a directly owned subsidiary of the MTR Corporation.

      an hour
    • Star Ferry

      The Star Ferry is a passenger ferry service operator and tourist attraction in Hong Kong. Its principal routes carry passengers across Victoria Harbour, between Hong Kong Island and Kowloon. The service is operated by the "Star" Ferry Company, which was founded in 1888 as the Kowloon Ferry Company, and adopted its present name in 1898. The fleet of twelve ferries operates two routes across the harbour, carrying over 70,000 passengers a day, or 26 million a year. Even though the harbour is crossed by railway and road tunnels, the Star Ferry continues to provide an inexpensive mode of harbour crossing. The company's main route runs between Central and Tsim Sha Tsui. It has been rated first in the “Top 10 Most Exciting Ferry Rides” poll by the Society of American Travel Writers (“SATW”) in February 2009.

      an hour
    • Avenue of Stars, Hong Kong

      The Avenue of Stars (Chinese: 星光大道), modelled on the Hollywood Walk of Fame, is located along the Victoria Harbour waterfront in Tsim Sha Tsui, Hong Kong. It honours celebrities of the Hong Kong film industry.

      an hour
    • Sky100

      sky100 (Chinese: 天際100) is a 360-degree indoor observation deck on the 100th floor of the International Commerce Centre, in West Kowloon, Hong Kong. sky100 is located two floors below The Ritz-Carlton, Hong Kong in the same building. Visitors reach the observation deck using high speed elevators, which travel from the 2/F entrance to the 100/F in 60 seconds. sky100's Advanced Telescope provides "sunny day setting" and pre-recorded views from bright days, and on-screen indicators point to landmarks. Other settings include night views and fireworks. Interactive touch screens dot the deck, offering facts, tips and an itinerary planner. The deck offers views of Hong Kong Island, Victoria Harbour, views of the Kowloon Peninsula and Tai Mo Shan in the background. There is a café serving local snacks and refreshments as well as a restaurant serving international cuisines on the 101st floor.

      an hour
    • Hong Kong Disneyland

      Hong Kong Disneyland (Chinese: 香港迪士尼樂園) is a theme park located on reclaimed land in Penny's Bay, Lantau Island. It is located inside the Hong Kong Disneyland Resort and it is owned and managed by Hong Kong International Theme Parks. It is, together with Ocean Park Hong Kong, one of the two large theme parks in Hong Kong. Hong Kong Disneyland opened to visitors on Monday, 12 September 2005 at 13:00 HKT. Disney attempted to avoid problems of cultural backlash by incorporating Chinese culture, customs, and traditions when designing and building the resort, including adherence to the rules of feng shui. For instance, a bend was put in a walkway near the Hong Kong Disneyland Resort entrance so good qi energy wouldn't flow into the South China Sea. The park consists of seven themed areas: Main Street, U.S.A., Fantasyland, Adventureland, Tomorrowland, Grizzly Gulch, Mystic Point, and Toy Story Land. The theme park's cast members speak Cantonese, English, and Mandarin. Guide maps are printed in traditional and simplified Chinese as well as English. The park has a daily capacity of 34,000 visitors — the lowest of all Disneyland parks. The park attracted 5.2 million visitors in its first year, below its target of 5.6 million. Visitor numbers fell 20% in the second year to 4 million, inciting criticisms from local legislators. However, the park attendance jumped by 8% in the third year, attracting a total of 4.5 million visitors in 2007. In 2009, the park attendance again increased by 2% to 4.8 million visitors. The attendance continued to surge and received 5.23 million guests in the 2009/2010 fiscal year. Since the opening of Hong Kong Disneyland, the theme park has hosted over 25 million guests. According to AECOM and TEA, Hong Kong Disneyland is the 13th most visited theme park in the world in 2013, with 7.4 million visitors. The park also turned a net profit of HK$109 million (US$13.97 million) for the year ended 29 September 2012, the first annual profit. Hong Kong Disneyland currently occupies 27.5 hectares (68 acres) and hosts 7.92 million to 8.92 million visitors annually. The park capacity will increase to handle up to 10 million visitors annually over a 15-year expansion period.

      10 hours
    • Happy Valley Racecourse

      The Happy Valley Racecourse is one of the two racecourses for horse racing and is a tourist attraction in Hong Kong. It is located in Happy Valley on Hong Kong Island, surrounded by Wong Nai Chung Road and Morrison Hill Road. The capacity of the venue is 55,000.

      an hour
    • Hong Kong 3D Museum

      Hong Kong 3D Museum (Chinese: 香港3D奇幻世界) is a privately owned art museum on Granville Road, Hong Kong. The museum specializes in trompe-l'œil and was opened on 7 July 2014. The artwork in the museum were created by local artists and focus on local culture and cityscape, with instructions to help visitors view and photograph the optical illusions as intended. The museum was inspired by the Trickeye Museum in Seoul and similar establishments in other Asian countries. In April 2015, Hong Kong 3D Museum hosted the first 3D exhibition on the manga series One Piece. The One Piece exhibition was criticized as prone to continuity errors but was otherwise well received. In May 2015, a subsidiary gallery of Hong Kong 3D Museum was opened in Ponte 16, Macau.

      3 hours
    • Hong Kong Space Museum

      The Hong Kong Space Museum (Chinese: 香港太空館) is a museum of astronomy and space science in Tsim Sha Tsui, Hong Kong. It is managed by the Leisure and Cultural Services Department of the Hong Kong Government.

      an hour
    • Peak Tram

      The Peak Tram (Chinese: 山頂纜車; Cantonese Yale: Sāandéng Laahmchē) is a funicular railway in Hong Kong, which carries both tourists and residents to the upper levels of Hong Kong Island. Running from Garden Road Admiralty to Victoria Peak via the Mid-Levels, it provides the most direct route and offers good views over the harbour and skyscrapers of Hong Kong. The Peak Tram is owned and operated by Hongkong and Shanghai Hotels (HSH), the owner of Hong Kong's famous Peninsula Hotel along with many other properties. The line, along with HSH's Peak Tower leisure complex at the line's summit, is promoted using the brand The Peak.

      an hour
    • Noonday Gun

      The Noonday Gun (Chinese: 午炮) is a former naval artillery piece mounted on a small enclosed site near the Causeway Bay Typhoon Shelter on Hong Kong Island, Hong Kong. Owned and operated by Jardine Matheson, the gun is fired every day at noon and has become a tourist attraction.

      an hour
    • Central–Mid-Levels escalator and walkway system

      The Central–Mid-Levels escalator and walkway system in Hong Kong is the longest outdoor covered escalator system in the world. Engineered by French company Constructions industrielles de la Méditerranée the entire system covers over 800 metres (2,600 ft) in distance and elevates over 135 metres (443 ft) from bottom to top. It was constructed in 1993 to provide a better commute by linking areas within the Central and Western District on Hong Kong Island.

      30 minutes
    • Hong Kong Park

      This article is about a park in Central, Hong Kong. For general information on the parks in Hong Kong, please refer to List of urban public parks and gardens of Hong Kong. The Hong Kong Park is a public park next to Cotton Tree Drive in Central, Hong Kong. Built at a cost of HK$398 million and opened in May 1991, it covers an area of 80,000 m2 and is an example of modern design and facilities blending with natural landscape.

      2 hours
    • Hong Kong Science Museum

      The Hong Kong Science Museum (Chinese: 香港科學館) is a science-themed museum in Tsim Sha Tsui East, Kowloon, Hong Kong, located next to the Hong Kong Museum of History.

      3 hours
    • Nursery Park, West Kowloon

      an hour
    • Discovery Bay

      Discovery Bay (DB, Chinese: 愉景灣) is a mixed, primarily residential, development consisting of upmarket residential development and private and public recreational facilities in Hong Kong. Situated on the north-eastern coast of Lantau Island in the New Territories, the development spans an area of 650 hectares (1,600 acres), and includes two bays, the Tai Pak Bay (大白灣) and Yi Pak Bay (二白灣). The 2011 census recorded 12,258 people living at DB; the developers said there were around 18,000 residents in mid-2011 with a sizeable community of expatriates from over thirty countries. DB is located 2 km west of Hong Kong Disneyland Resort and approximately 12 km west from the nearest point on Hong Kong Island. Discovery Bay currently (April 2009) consists of 14 residential development phases with properties ranging from garden houses to high-rise towers of up to 24 storeys. The development also features a 400-metre-long privately owned beach (accessible to the public but no lifeguards present), four private membership clubs including a golf club and a marina club and a public park (Siena Central Park). The absence of public recreational facilities is a bone of discontent with the residents especially in view of the fact that the developer has an outstanding obligation to provide 300,000 square metres of such facilities as part of the original plan. Though Discovery Bay is considered in Hong Kong to be a low-density development due to the amount of open spaces (as measured by the plot to development ratio of 0.12), Discovery Bay is however the second most populous district (after the New Town of Tung Chung) on the sparsely populated Lantau Island. Pets are allowed in Discovery Bay.

      2 hours
    • Yuen Po Street Bird Garden

      Yuen Po Street Bird Garden (Chinese: 園圃街雀鳥花園) is located in Mong Kok, Kowloon, Hong Kong, directly west of Mong Kok Stadium. The garden occupies an area of 3,000m2 and is bounded by Boundary Street, Embankment Road, Prince Edward Road West and Yuen Po Street.

      an hour
    • Goldfish Market

      an hour
    • SIGHTSEEING (30)

    • Victoria Harbour

      Victoria Harbour is a natural landform harbour situated between Hong Kong Island and Kowloon in Hong Kong. The harbour's deep, sheltered waters and strategic location on the South China Sea were instrumental in Hong Kong's establishment as a British colony and its subsequent development as a trading centre. Throughout its history, the harbour has seen numerous reclamation projects undertaken on both shores, many of which have caused controversy in recent years. Environmental concerns have been expressed about the effects of these expansions, in terms of water quality and loss of natural habitat. It has also been proposed that benefits of land reclamation may be less than the effects of decreased harbour width, affecting the number of vessels passing through the harbour. Nonetheless Victoria Harbour still retains its founding role as a port for thousands of international vessels each year. The harbour is a major tourist attraction of Hong Kong. Lying in the middle of the territory's dense urban region, the harbour is the site of annual fireworks displays and its promenades are used as gathering places for tourists and residents.

      an hour
    • Nan Lian Garden

      The Nan Lian Garden (Chinese: 南蓮園池; Cantonese Yale: nàamlìn yún chì) is a Chinese Classical Garden in Diamond Hill, Hong Kong. The garden has an area of 3.5 hectares. It is designed in the Tang Dynasty-style with hills, water features, trees, rocks and wooden structures. The garden was a joint project of the Chi Lin Nunnery and the Hong Kong Government. It opened to the public on November 14, 2006. The garden is open daily from 7am to 9pm.

      an hour
    • Chi Lin Nunnery

      Chi Lin Nunnery (Chinese: 志蓮淨苑; Jyutping: zi3 lin4 zing6 jyun2; Cantonese Yale: Jilìhn Jihng Yún) is a large Buddhist temple complex located in Diamond Hill, Kowloon, Hong Kong. It was founded in 1934 as a retreat for Buddhist nuns and was rebuilt in the 1990s following the traditional Tang Dynasty architecture. The temple halls have statues of the Sakyamuni Buddha, the goddess of mercy Guanyin and other bodhisattvas. These statues are made from gold, clay, wood and stone. The temple halls and the Chinese garden in front of the nunnery are open to the public daily free of charge.

      an hour
    • Lascar Row

      Lascar Row is the combined name of two streets between Hollywood Road and Queen's Road Central in Sheung Wan, Hong Kong. The streets are Upper Lascar Row (摩羅上街) and Lower Lascar Row. "Lascar Row" usually refers to the former, since most of Lower Lascar Row was redesigned for vehicular traffic and renamed Lok Ku Road. With many antique shops, Lascar Row is a popular tourist destination.

      an hour
    • Causeway Bay

      Causeway Bay (Chinese: 銅鑼灣) is a heavily built-up area of Hong Kong, located on Hong Kong Island, and covering parts of Wan Chai District. The Cantonese name is also romanised as Tung Lo Wan as in Tung Lo Wan Road (銅鑼灣道). The rent in the shopping areas of Causeway Bay was ranked as the world's most expensive for the second year in a row, after overtaking New York City's Fifth Avenue in 2012.

      2 hours
    • Central Plaza (Hong Kong)

      Central Plaza is a 78-storey, 374 m (1,227 ft) skyscraper completed in August 1992 at 18 Harbour Road, in Wan Chai on Hong Kong Island in Hong Kong. It is the third tallest tower in the city after 2 International Finance Centre in Central and the ICC in West Kowloon. It was the tallest building in Asia from 1992 to 1996, until the Shun Hing Square in neighbouring Shenzhen was built. Central Plaza surpassed the Bank of China Tower as the tallest building in Hong Kong until the completion of 2 IFC. Central Plaza was also the tallest reinforced concrete building in the world, until it was surpassed by CITIC Plaza, Guangzhou. The building uses a triangular floor plan. On the top of the tower is a four-bar neon clock that indicates the time by displaying different colours for 15-minute periods, blinking at the change of the quarter. An anemometer is installed on the tip of the building's mast, at 378 metres (1,240 ft) above sea level. The mast has a height of 102 m (335 ft). It also houses the world's highest church inside a skyscraper, Sky City Church.

      an hour
    • Man Mo Temple (Hong Kong)

      Man Mo Temple or Man Mo Miu is Cantonese for Wen Wu temple (Chinese: 文武廟; Jyutping: man4 mou5 miu6), a temple for the worship of the civil or literature god Man Tai (文帝) / Man Cheong (文昌) and the martial god Mo Tai (武帝) / Kwan Tai (關帝). The two gods were popularly patronized by scholars and students seeking progress in their study or ranking in the civil examinations in the Ming and Qing dynasties. There are several Man Mo Temples in Hong Kong, the best known of which is the temple in Sheung Wan.

      an hour
    • Tian Tan Buddha

      Tian Tan Buddha, also known as the Big Buddha, is a large bronze statue of Buddha Shakyamuni, completed in 1993, and located at Ngong Ping, Lantau Island, in Hong Kong. The statue is sited near Po Lin Monastery and symbolises the harmonious relationship between man and nature, people and faith. It is a major centre of Buddhism in Hong Kong, and is also a popular tourist attraction.

      an hour
    • Kowloon Park

      Kowloon Park is a large public park in Tsim Sha Tsui, Kowloon, Hong Kong. It has an area of 13.3 hectares (33 acres) and is managed by the Leisure and Cultural Services Department.

      2 hours
    • Temple Street, Hong Kong

      Temple Street (traditional Chinese: 廟街; simplified Chinese: 庙街; pinyin: Miào Jiē; Cantonese Yale: miu6 gaai1) is a street located in the areas of Jordan and Yau Ma Tei in Kowloon, Hong Kong. It is known for its night market and as one of the busiest flea markets at night in the territory. The night market lies in the Yau Ma Tei, Jordan part of the street. Popular with tourists and locals alike in the evening, it is also common to see the place crowded at dusk. It sells cheap merchandise and food items. The place is sometimes known as "Men's Street".

      an hour
    • Chungking Mansions

      Chungking Mansions is a building located at 36–44 Nathan Road in Tsim Sha Tsui, Kowloon, Hong Kong. The building is well known as nearly the cheapest accommodation in Hong Kong. Though the building was supposed to be residential, it is made up of many independent low-budget hotels, shops and other services. The unusual atmosphere of the building is sometimes compared to that of the former Kowloon Walled City. Chungking Mansions features guesthouses, curry restaurants, African bistros, clothing shops, sari stores, and foreign exchange offices. It often acts as a large gathering place for some of the ethnic minorities in Hong Kong, particularly South Asians (Indians, Nepalese, Pakistanis, Bangladeshis and Sri Lankans), Middle Eastern people, Nigerians, Europeans, Americans, and many other peoples of the world. Peter Shadbolt of CNN stated that the complex was the "unofficial African quarter of Hong Kong". The building was completed in 1961, at which time Chinese residents predominated. Now, after more than five decades of use, there are an estimated 4,000 people living in the complex.

      an hour
    • Tin Hau Temple

      an hour
    • Mong Kok

      Mong Kok (also spelled Mongkok, often abbreviated as MK) is an area in the Yau Tsim Mong District, on the western part of Kowloon Peninsula in Hong Kong. The Prince Edward area occupies the northern part of Mong Kok. Mong Kok is one of the major shopping areas in Hong Kong. The area is characterized by a mixture of old and new multi-story buildings, with shops and restaurants at street level, and commercial or residential units above. Major industries in Mong Kok are retail, restaurants (including fast food) and entertainment. It has been described and portrayed in films as an area in which triads run bars, nightclubs, and massage parlors. With its extremely high population density of 130,000/km2 or 340,000 per square mile, Mong Kok was described as the busiest district in the world by the Guinness World Records.

      3 hours
    • Flower Market

      an hour
    • Fa Yuen Street

      Fa Yuen Street (traditional Chinese: 花園街; simplified Chinese: 花园街; pinyin: Huāyuán Jiē; Cantonese Yale: fa1 yun4 gaai1) is a street between Boundary Street and Dundas Street in Mong Kok, Kowloon, Hong Kong. With over fifty stores selling sport shoes, the street is famous for selling sport gear and is known as Sport Shoes Street or Sneaker Street (波鞋街). Fa Yuen (花園) means "garden" in Cantonese. A much debated project of the Urban Renewal Authority may modify the street substantially.

      an hour
    • Tung Choi Street

      Tung Choi Street (Chinese: 通菜街; pinyin: Tōngcài Jiē; Cantonese Yale: tung1 choi3 gaai1) is a street situated between south of Sai Yeung Choi Street and Fa Yuen Street in Mong Kok, Kowloon, Hong Kong. It is one of the most well-known street markets in Hong Kong. Its southern section, popularly known as Ladies' Market or Ladies' Street (女人街), sells various, low-priced products for women and also other general merchandise. Its northern section not far above Bute Street, has a wide variety of affordable plants, pet supplies and animals especially goldfish since it is also known as "Goldfish Street".

      2 hours
    • Langham Place (Hong Kong)

      Langham Place is a commercial skyscraper complex and shopping mall completed in 2004 the Mong Kok area of Kowloon, Hong Kong. The official opening was on 25 January 2005. The complex occupies two entire blocks defined by Argyle Street, Portland Street, Shantung Street and Reclamation Street. Shanghai Street separates the two portions of the complex which are connected via two overhead walkways. A hotel is on one side of the development while the commercial elements are located on the other side. The complex was the result of an urban renewal project under Land Development Corporation, later known as Urban Renewal Authority (URA). Several city blocks, including the old "Bird Street" marketplace, were demolished to make way for the commercial complex. Langham Place Tower has a gross floor area of 17,000 m2 (180,000 sq ft), and comprises a 59-storey office tower, a 15-level shopping centre with two basement levels, a 665-room hotel and a car park with 250 parking spaces. The complex is connected to the Mong Kok Station of the MTR via an underground passage (Exit C3).

      2 hours
    • Canton Road

      Canton Road is a major road in Hong Kong, linking the former west reclamation shore in Tsim Sha Tsui, Jordan, Yau Ma Tei and Mong Kok on the Kowloon Peninsula. The road runs mostly parallel and west to Nathan Road. It starts from the junction with Salisbury Road in the south and ends in the north at the junction with Lai Chi Kok Road in the Prince Edward area. The southern part Canton Road is home to many upscale retail shops, shopping centres and others business establishments, with busy traffic from both vehicles and pedestrians from morning till late night.

      2 hours
    • Clock Tower, Hong Kong

      The Clock Tower is a landmark in Hong Kong. It is located on the southern shore of Tsim Sha Tsui, Kowloon. It is the only remnant of the original site of the former Kowloon Station on the Kowloon-Canton Railway. Officially named Former Kowloon-Canton Railway Clock Tower (Chinese: 前九廣鐵路鐘樓), it is usually referred to as the Tsim Sha Tsui Clock Tower (Chinese: 尖沙咀鐘樓) for its location. Built out of red bricks and granite, the Clock Tower peaks at 44 metres, and is topped by a 7-metre lightning rod. The top of the tower can be reached by a wooden staircase located within. The interior of Clock Tower had previously been open for visit, but is currently closed for maintenance. The clock tower is located near Victoria Harbour at the foot of Salisbury Road. Another landmark, the Tsim Sha Tsui Ferry Pier, is located nearby. The tower has been listed as a declared monument in Hong Kong since 2000.

      an hour
    • Tsim Sha Tsui

      Tsim Sha Tsui (Chinese: 尖沙咀), often abbreviated as TST, is an urban area in southern Kowloon, Hong Kong. The area is administratively part of the Yau Tsim Mong District. Tsim Sha Tsui East is a piece of land reclaimed from the Hung Hom Bay now east of Tsim Sha Tsui. The area is bounded north by Austin Road and in the east by Hong Chong Road and Cheong Wan Road. Geographically, Tsim Sha Tsui is a cape on the tip of the Kowloon Peninsula pointing towards Victoria Harbour, opposite Central. Several villages had been established in this location before Kowloon was ceded to the British Empire in 1860. Tsim Sha Tsui in Chinese means sharp sandspit. It was also known as Heung Po Tau (香埗頭), i.e. a port for exporting incense tree. Tsim Sha Tsui is a major tourist hub in metropolitan Hong Kong, with many high-end shops and restaurants that cater to tourists. Many of Hong Kong's museums are located in the area.

      2 hours
    • Golden Bauhinia Square

      The Golden Bauhinia Square (Chinese: 金紫荊廣場; Jyutping: gam1 zi2 ging1 gwong2 coeng4) is an open area in Wan Chai, Hong Kong. The square was named after the giant statue of a golden Bauhinia blakeana at the centre of the area, situated outside the Hong Kong Convention and Exhibition Centre, where the ceremonies for the handover of Hong Kong and the establishment of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region were held in July 1997. A flag-raising ceremony is held every day at 8:00 am. It is considered a tourist attraction. The sculpture, a gilded flower bauhinia, is six metres high. The major part is composed of a bauhinia on a base of red granite pillar on a pyramid. The sculpture is deemed an important symbol for the Hong Kong people after the handover. On the second day of Chinese New Year and National Day of the People's Republic of China, the square is lighted up by a firework show. The Golden Bauhinia has also been nicknamed the "Golden Pak Choi" by locals.

      an hour
    • Lan Kwai Fong

      Lan Kwai Fong (often abbreviated as LKF) is a small square of streets in Central, Hong Kong. The area was dedicated to hawkers before the Second World War, but underwent a renaissance in the mid-1980s. It is now a popular expatriate haunt in Hong Kong for drinking, clubbing and dining. The street Lan Kwai Fong is L-shaped with two ends joining with D'Aguilar Street. The Lan Kwai Fong Association is a non-profit making business chamber which groups together over 100 restaurants, bars, clubs, retailers and service providers in Lan Kwai Fong to promote the area to locals and the world.

      2 hours
    • Wan Chai Market

      The former Wan Chai Market (Chinese: 灣仔街市) building was constructed in 1937. It is located at 264 Queen's Road East, at Wan Chai Road crossing, opposite Stone Nullah Lane in Wan Chai, Hong Kong Island. It is a Grade III Historic Building. Its architectural style is influenced by Streamline Moderne (also known as Streamlined Moderne or Art Moderne) architecture, a popular style of building of the 1930s. It is often erroneously referred to as a Bauhaus-style building. Wan Chai Market, the wet market housed in the old market building since 1937, has moved into the new market complex on the lower levels of "The Zenith", a newly built residential development located just opposite to the market building, in September 2008. The Wan Chai Market was initially a wet place where merchants would sell their belongings. It was also used as a garage for Bullock Carts and thus was called 濕車庫, which means 'Wet Garage'. It was named in 1917.

      an hour
    • Tai O

      Tai O (Chinese: 大澳) is a fishing town, partly located on an island of the same name, on the western side of Lantau Island in Hong Kong. The village names means large inlet, referring to outlet for the waterways (Tai O Creek and Tai O River) merges as it moves through Tai O.

      2 hours
    • SoHo, Hong Kong

      The SoHo (Chinese: 蘇豪; also 荷南 and 荷南美食區; formally 中環蘇豪區) district in Hong Kong is an entertainment zone located in Central and bordering between Lan Kwai Fong and Sheung Wan, within Central. The name is derived from its location: South of Hollywood Road.

      2 hours
    • Pacific Place

      Pacific Place is a complex of office towers, hotels and a shopping centre situated at 88 Queensway, in Admiralty, Hong Kong. The latest phase, Three Pacific Place, is located at 1 Queen's Road East Wan Chai. The four-level mall is home to over 130 shops and boutiques and one major department store. The complex is also home to three five-star hotels, a boutique hotel, three Grade-A office towers and 270 five-star serviced apartments. Pacific Place complex is owned and managed by Swire Properties, with the exception of the three hotels (Conrad Hong Kong, Island Shangri-La and JW Marriott Hotel), in each of which it retains a 20% equity interest.

      2 hours
    • International Finance Centre (Hong Kong)

      The International Finance Centre (abbr. IFC, branded as "ifc") is a skyscraper and an integrated commercial development on the waterfront of Hong Kong's Central District. A prominent landmark on Hong Kong Island, IFC consists of two skyscrapers, the IFC Mall, and the 55-storey Four Seasons Hotel Hong Kong. Tower 2 is the second tallest building in Hong Kong (415 m), behind the International Commerce Centre in West Kowloon. It is the fourth-tallest building in the Greater China region and the eighth-tallest office building in the world, based on structural heights; by roof height, only the Taipei 101, Shanghai World Financial Center, Willis Tower, International Commerce Centre and Burj Khalifa exceed it. It is of similar height to the former World Trade Center. The Airport Express Hong Kong Station is directly beneath it. IFC was constructed and is owned by IFC Development, a consortium of Sun Hung Kai Properties, Henderson Land and Towngas. In 2003, Financial Times, HSBC, and Cathay Pacific put up an advertisement on the facade that stretched more than 50 storeys, covering an area of 19,000 m2 (0.2 million square ft) and a length of 230 m, making it the world's largest advertisement ever put on a skyscraper.

      2 hours
    • Wong Tai Sin Temple (Hong Kong)

      Wong Tai Sin Temple (Chinese: 黃大仙祠; Jyutping: wong4 daai6 sin1 ci4) is a well known shrine and major tourist attraction in Hong Kong. It is dedicated to Wong Tai Sin, or the Great Immortal Wong. The 18,000 m2 (190,000 sq ft) Taoist temple is famed for the many prayers answered: "What you request is what you get" (有求必應) via a practice called kau cim. The temple is located on the southern side of Lion Rock in the north of Kowloon.

      an hour
    • Sai Kung Town

      Sai Kung Town (Chinese: 西貢市) or simply Sai Kung (Chinese: 西貢) is a town on Sai Kung Peninsula, facing Sai Kung Hoi (Inner Port Shelter), part of Sai Kung District in the New Territories, Hong Kong. Sai Kung is the centre of the surrounding villages, and hence the name may refer to the areas in its immediate surroundings.

      6 hours
    • Ten Thousand Buddhas Monastery

      The Ten Thousand Buddhas Monastery (Chinese: 萬佛寺; pinyin: wàn fó sì; Jyutping: maan6 fat6 zi6) is a mid-20th century Buddhist temple located in Sha Tin, Hong Kong, at 220 Pai Tau Village. Its designation as a monastery is actually a misnomer because there are no monks residing at the complex, which is managed solely by laypersons. Both the main temple building and the pagoda are listed as Grade III historic buildings by the Government of Hong Kong. Groundbreaking and construction of the temple began in 1951 under Yuet Kai and his followers, and the structure was finished six years later. It closed for three years at the end of the 20th century after one of its caretakers was killed in a mudslide caused by poorly-maintained slopes nearby. The main journey up to the monastery is an attraction itself, as the path is lined on both sides with golden Buddhas, each unique and in different poses. Despite the common translation of its name, the monastery actually contains nearly 13,000 Buddha statues.

      an hour
    • MUSEUMS AND CULTURE (4)

    • Hong Kong Museum of Art

      The Hong Kong Museum of Art (Chinese: 香港藝術館) is the main art museum of Hong Kong. It is managed by the Leisure and Cultural Services Department of the Hong Kong Government. A branch museum, the Flagstaff House Museum of Tea Ware, is situated in the Hong Kong Park. The Hong Kong Museum of Art closed in 2015 for an extensive, multi-year renovation. It is scheduled to reopen in 2019.

      3 hours
    • Hong Kong Museum of History

      The Hong Kong Museum of History (Chinese: 香港歷史博物館; pinyin: Xiānggǎng Lìshǐ Bówùguǎn; Jyutping: Hoeng1 Gong2 Lik6 Si2 Bok3 Mat6 Gun2) is a museum which preserves Hong Kong's historical and cultural heritage. It is located next to the Hong Kong Science Museum, in Tsim Sha Tsui, Kowloon, Hong Kong. The collections of the museum encompass natural history, archaeology, ethnography and local history.

      2 hours
    • Hong Kong Heritage Museum

      Hong Kong Heritage Museum (Chinese: 香港文化博物館) is a museum of history, art and culture in Sha Tin, Hong Kong, located beside the Shing Mun River. The museum opened on 16 December 2000. It is managed by the Leisure and Cultural Services Department of the Hong Kong Government. The six permanent exhibits and the original temporary exhibits were designed by design firm Reich+Petch along with Lord Cultural Resources. The museum building is the largest in Hong Kong, and can accommodate up to 6,000 visitors.

      3 hours
    • Alexander Grantham

      Sir Alexander William George Herder Grantham, GCMG (葛量洪 1899–1978) was a British colonial administrator who governed Hong Kong and Fiji.

      30 minutes
    • GASTRONOMY (14)

    • Café de Coral

      Café de Coral (traditional Chinese: 大家樂; simplified Chinese: 大家乐; pinyin: Dàjiālè; Jyutping: daai6 gaa1 lok6; Cantonese Yale: Daaih Gā Lok, SEHK: 0341) is a fast food restaurant group which owns and operates fast food chains and restaurants including Café de Coral, The Spaghetti House, Manchu Wok, Oliver's Super Sandwiches, Ah Yee Leng Tong, and others. Founded in 1968, the Café de Coral group opened its first Café de Coral restaurant in the Causeway Bay district of Hong Kong in 1969. Since then, the group has grown to operate over 580 separate outlets across its brands all over the world. It is the largest Chinese fast food restaurant group in Hong Kong and in the world. In Hong Kong alone, it caters to over 300,000 people on an average day.

      an hour
    • Kam Fung Cafe

      an hour
    • Lung Fung Cafe

      an hour
    • Australia Dairy Company

      Australia Dairy Company (澳洲牛奶公司) is a traditional Hong Kong restaurant, cha chaan teng, in Jordan, Hong Kong, specialising in steamed milk pudding, scrambled eggs, toast and custard dishes. The company was named by the founder, who had worked on an Australian farm in the 1940s. The restaurant's brand name was coined from dairy. Founded in 1970 by a Tang family, it is one of the oldest restaurants in Hong Kong. It has been mentioned by The Guardian as one of the top 10 budget restaurants in Hong Kong. The restaurant is notable for its efficient but often rude service, with a short average customer visit length of only 10 minutes. It is also famous for its signature egg custard pudding and scrambled eggs. It has been described as an iconic Hong Kong restaurant.

      an hour
    • Kam Wah Cafe

      an hour
    • Sea View Congee Shop

      an hour
    • Paradise Group Holdings

      Paradise Group Holdings Pte Ltd is a Singapore-based restaurant group incorporated in 2008 by Eldwin Chua, and Edlan Chua. The company's restaurants serve a variety of Chinese cuisine. Their brands include Seafood Paradise, Paradise Inn, Taste Paradise, Paradise Dynasty, KungFu Paradise, Paradise Pavilion, One Paradise and Canton Paradise. In 2015 the company operates restaurants are currently in Singapore and in Malaysia, Indonesia and China.

      2 hours
    • Yee Shun Dairy Company

      an hour
    • Lee Kum Kee

      Lee Kum Kee International Holdings Ltd. (Chinese: 李錦記集團) is a Hong Kong-based food company which specialized in manufacturing oyster flavored sauce and a wide range of Chinese and Asian sauces. Founded by Lee Kum Sheung in 1888 in Nanshui, Canton (now Guangdong), Lee Kum Kee produces over 200 Chinese-style sauces, including soy sauce, hoisin sauce, XO sauce, one-step recipe sauce, chili sauce, cooking ingredients, and dipping sauce. The group also purchased London's landmark Walkie-Talkie skyscraper in July 2017 for £1.3bn, which was a record-breaking transaction for a single building in the UK.

      an hour
    • Hanjuku Kobo 半熟工房

      an hour
    • Tim Ho Wan

      Tim Ho Wan (Chinese: 添好運) is a Chinese dimsum restaurant chain that originated in Hong Kong. It now has 45 locations around Hong Kong, China, Taiwan, Singapore, the Philippines, Australia, Vietnam, Malaysia, Thailand and the United States.

      an hour
    • Royal Plaza Hotel (Hong Kong)

      Royal Plaza Hotel (Chinese: 帝京酒店) is a five-star hotel in Prince Edward Road West, Mong Kok, Kowloon, Hong Kong that started operation in 1997. Owned by Sun Hung Kai Properties, it is located next to Grand Century Place and near MTR Mong Kok East Station.

      an hour
    • Little Bao

      an hour
    • Stormies

      2 hours
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