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Where do you want to visit in Iceland

    • SIGHTSEEING (38)

    • Jökulsárlón

      Jökulsárlón (Icelandic pronunciation: [ˈjœːkʏlsˌaurˌloun̥] ( listen); literally "glacial river lagoon") is a large glacial lake in southeast Iceland, on the edge of Vatnajökull National Park. Situated at the head of the Breiðamerkurjökull glacier, it developed into a lake after the glacier started receding from the edge of the Atlantic Ocean. The lake has grown since then at varying rates because of melting of the glaciers. It is now 1.5 km (0.93 mi) away from the ocean's edge and covers an area of about 18 km2 (6.9 sq mi). It recently became the deepest lake in Iceland, at over 248 m (814 ft), as glacial retreat extended its boundaries. The size of the lake has increased fourfold since the 1970s. It is considered as one of the natural wonders of Iceland. The lake can be seen from Route 1 between Höfn and Skaftafell. It appears as "a ghostly procession of luminous blue icebergs". Jökulsárlón has been a setting for four Hollywood movies: A View to a Kill, Die Another Day, Lara Croft: Tomb Raider, and Batman Begins, as well as the reality TV series Amazing Race. In 1991, Iceland issued a postage stamp, with a face value of 26 kronur, depicting Jökulsárlón. The tongue of the Breiðamerkurjökull glacier is a major attraction for tourists.

      2 hours
    • Skógafoss

      Skógafoss (pronounced [ˈskou.aˌfɔs]) is a waterfall situated on the Skógá River in the south of Iceland at the cliffs of the former coastline. After the coastline had receded seaward (it is now at a distance of about 5 kilometres (3.1 miles) from Skógar), the former sea cliffs remained, parallel to the coast over hundreds of kilometres, creating together with some mountains a clear border between the coastal lowlands and the Highlands of Iceland.

      an hour
    • Dettifoss

      an hour
    • Reykjadalur Hot Spring Thermal River

      an hour
    • Námafjall hverir viewpoint

      an hour
    • Reynisfjara Beach

      2 hours
    • Svartifoss

      Svartifoss (Black Falls) is a waterfall in Skaftafell in Vatnajökull National Park in Iceland, and is one of the most popular sights in the park. It is surrounded by dark lava columns, which gave rise to its name. Other well-known columnar jointing formations are seen at the Giant's Causeway in Northern Ireland, Devil's Tower in Wyoming, United States and on the island of Staffa in Scotland. There are also similar formations throughout Iceland, including a small cave on the beach of Reynisdrangar. The base of this waterfall is noteworthy for its sharp rocks. New hexagonal column sections break off faster than the falling water wears down the edges. These basalt columns have provided inspiration for Icelandic architects, most visibly in the Hallgrímskirkja church in Reykjavík, and also the National Theatre.

      an hour
    • Lake Viti

      2 hours
    • Seljalandsfoss

      Seljalandsfoss is a waterfall in Iceland. Seljalandsfoss is located in the South Region in Iceland right by Route 1 and the road that leads to Þórsmörk Road 249. The waterfall drops 60 m (197 ft) and is part of the Seljalands River that has its origin in the volcano glacier Eyjafjallajökull. Visitors can walk behind the falls into a small cave.

      an hour
    • Geysir

      For the ship of the same name, see MV Geysir, see also Geyser (disambiguation). Geysir (Icelandic pronunciation: ​[ˈgeːisɪr̥] ( listen)), sometimes known as The Great Geysir, is a geyser in southwestern Iceland. It was the first geyser described in a printed source and the first known to modern Europeans. The English word geyser (a periodically spouting hot spring) derives from Geysir. The name Geysir itself is derived from the Icelandic verb geysa, "to gush", the verb from Old Norse. Geysir lies in the Haukadalur valley on the slopes of Laugarfjall hill, which is also the home to Strokkur geyser about 50 metres south. Eruptions at Geysir can hurl boiling water up to 70 metres in the air. However, eruptions may be infrequent, and have in the past stopped altogether for years at a time.

      an hour
    • Thrihnukagigur

      Þríhnúkagígur (Icelandic pronunciation: ​[ˈθr̥iːˈn̥uːkaˈciːɣʏr̥], anglicized as Thrihnukagigur, literally translated as Three Peaks Crater) is a dormant volcano near Reykjavík, Iceland. Covering a 3,270 square metres (35,200 sq ft) area and a depth of 213 meters (699 ft), it has not erupted since the second century BC. It was discovered in 1974 by cave explorer Árni B Stefánsson, and opened for tourism in 2012. It is the only volcano in the world where visitors can take an elevator into the magma chamber. The magma that would normally fill the chamber and become sealed is believed to have drained away, revealing the rift beneath the surface. In August 2015, the members of the Icelandic band Kaleo and fourteen support staff descended into the volcano's magma chamber and recorded a live rendition of the band's song "Way Down We Go". In 2016 the Secret Solstice music festival announced that alternative rock musician Chino Moreno of Deftones will perform the first ever public concert inside the magma chamber of a volcano.

      3 hours
    • Kerið

      Kerið (occasionally Anglicized as Kerith or Kerid) is a volcanic crater lake located in the Grímsnes area in south Iceland, along the Golden Circle. It is one of several crater lakes in the area, known as Iceland's Western Volcanic Zone, which includes the Reykjanes peninsula and the Langjökull Glacier, created as the land moved over a localized hotspot, but it is the one that has the most visually recognizable caldera still intact. The caldera, like the other volcanic rock in the area, is composed of a red (rather than black) volcanic rock. The caldera itself is approximately 55 m (180 ft) deep, 170 m (560 ft) wide, and 270 m (890 ft) across. Kerið’s caldera is one of the three most recognizable volcanic craters because at approximately 3,000 years old, it is only half the age of most of the surrounding volcanic features. The other two are Seyðishólar and Kerhóll. While most of the crater is steep-walled with little vegetation, one wall is sloped more gently and blanketed with a deep moss, and can be descended fairly easily. The lake itself is fairly shallow (7–14 metres, depending on rainfall and other factors), but due to minerals from the soil, is an opaque and strikingly vivid aquamarine. Land owners Kerfélagið ehf. charge an entrance fee to see the crater of 400 ISK (as of July 2017).

      an hour
    • Skaftafell / Vatnajökull National Park

      2 hours
    • Gullfoss

      Gullfoss ("Golden Falls"; Icelandic pronunciation ) is a waterfall located in the canyon of Olfusa river in southwest Iceland. Gullfoss is one of the most popular tourist attractions in Iceland. The wide Ölfusá river rushes southward, and about a kilometre above the falls it turns sharply to the right and flows down into a wide curved three-step "staircase" and then abruptly plunges in two stages (11 metres or 36 feet, and 21 metres or 69 feet) into a crevice 32 metres (105 ft) deep. The crevice, about 20 metres (66 ft) wide and 2.5 kilometres (1.6 mi) in length, extends perpendicular to the flow of the river. The average amount of water running down the waterfall is 140 cubic metres (4,900 cu ft) per second in the summer and 80 cubic metres (2,800 cu ft) per second in the winter. The highest flood measured was 2,000 cubic metres (71,000 cu ft) per second. As one first approaches the falls, the edge is obscured from view, so that it appears that the river simply vanishes into the earth. During the first half of the 20th century and some years into the late 20th century, there was much speculation about using Gullfoss to generate electricity. During this period, the waterfall was rented indirectly by its owners, Tómas Tómasson and Halldór Halldórsson, to foreign investors. However, the investors' attempts were unsuccessful, partly due to lack of money. The waterfall was later sold to the state of Iceland, and is now protected. Sigríður Tómasdóttir, the daughter of Tómas Tómasson, was determined to preserve the waterfall's condition and even threatened to throw herself down. Although it is widely believed, the very popular story that Sigríður saved the waterfall from exploitation is untrue. A stone memorial to Sigriður, located above the falls, depicts her profile. Together with Þingvellir and the geysers of Haukadalur, Gullfoss forms part of the Golden Circle, a popular day excursion for tourists in Iceland.

      2 hours
    • Krýsuvík

      The geothermal area Krýsuvík is situated on the Reykjanes peninsula in Iceland. It is in the south of Reykjanes in the middle of the fissure zone on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge which traverses Iceland. Krýsuvík consists of several geothermal fields, such as Seltún. Here solfataras, fumaroles, mud pots and hot springs have formed, the soil is coloured bright yellow, red, and green hues. Sulphur deposits were mined in 1722 - 1728 and in the 19th century. German scientist Robert Bunsen visited the site in 1845 and, based on research there, proposed a hypothesis on formation of sulphuric acid in nature. Near the geothermal fields are several maars - craters created by the explosions of overheated groundwater. The unusual green-blue Grænavatn lake has formed in one of these maars. Test boreholes were made here in the early 1970s, some of the boreholes have turned into irregular, artificial geysers, one of which exploded in 1999, leaving a crater. Krýsuvík is a popular hiking area and tourism infrastructure - such as wooden pathways - has been developed. The biggest lake in the area, Kleifarvatn, began to diminish after a big earthquake in 2000; 20% of its surface has since disappeared. In this area there were some farms until the 19th century, after which they were abandoned. Only a small chapel, Krísuvíkurkirkja, built in 1857, remained, until it burned to the ground on January 2, 2010. The music video for the song "Never Forget" by Greta Salóme & Jónsi was filmed in this area. This song also went to the Eurovision Song Contest 2012 in Baku, Azerbaijan and came 20th in the grand final.

      an hour
    • Fjaðrárgljúfur

      2 hours
    • Grundarfjörður

      Grundarfjörður is a small town, situated in the north of the Snæfellsnesfesfoss peninsula in the west of Iceland. It is situated between a mountain range and the sea. The nearby mountain Kirkjufell forms a small peninsula.

      2 hours
    • Hallgrímskirkja

      Hallgrímskirkja (Icelandic pronunciation: ​[ˈhatl̥krimsˌcʰɪrca], church of Hallgrímur) is a Lutheran (Church of Iceland) parish church in Reykjavík, Iceland. At 74.5 metres (244 ft) high, it is the largest church in Iceland and among the tallest structures in Iceland. The church is named after the Icelandic poet and clergyman Hallgrímur Pétursson (1614–1674), author of the Passion Hymns.

      an hour
    • Harpa (concert hall)

      Harpa is a concert hall and conference centre in Reykjavík, Iceland. The opening concert was held on May 4, 2011. The building features a distinctive colored glass facade inspired by the basalt landscape of Iceland.

      an hour
    • Blue Lagoon (geothermal spa)

      The Blue Lagoon (Icelandic: Bláa lónið) geothermal spa is one of the most visited attractions in Iceland. The spa is located in a lava field in Grindavík on the Reykjanes Peninsula, southwestern Iceland in a location favourable for Geothermal power, and is supplied by water used in the nearby Svartsengi geothermal power station. Bláa lónið is situated approximately 20 km (12 mi) from the Keflavík International Airport and 39 km (24 mi) from the capital city of Reykjavík, roughly a 21-minute drive from the airport and a 50-minute drive from Reykjavík.

      2 hours
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