Where do you want to visit in Tokyo

    • SIGHTSEEING (51)

    • Ameya Yokocho

      Ameya-Yokochō (アメヤ横丁, Ameya alley) is an open-air market in the Taito Ward of Tokyo, Japan, located next to Ueno Station.The market is approximately 164,227 square feet in area, starting just behind the Yodobashi Camera building and following the Yamanote Line south until the Komuro building. There are two theories on the etymology of Ameya. The first is that the name came from ameya (飴屋, candy shop), because of all the candy stores that lined the street in the early post-war era when sugar was hard to come by. Even now, there are stores selling candy there. The second theory is that it refers to アメリカ (America); there used to be stores selling surplus American army goods just after World War II. In either case, it is now commonly referred to simply as ameyoko (アメ横). The market is home to over one hundred and eighty one shops, which sell products ranging from fresh food and fish to clothing and time pieces.

      Time on site: 2 hours
    • Meiji Jingu

      Meiji Shrine (明治神宮, Meiji Jingū), located in Shibuya, Tokyo, is the Shinto shrine that is dedicated to the deified spirits of Emperor Meiji and his wife, Empress Shōken. The shrine does not contain the emperor's grave, which is located at Fushimi-momoyama, south of Kyoto.

      Time on site: an hour
    • Ryogoku Kokugikan

      Time on site: 2 hours
    • Shinjuku Gyoen National Garden

      Shinjuku Gyo-en (新宿御苑) is a large park and garden in Shinjuku and Shibuya, Tokyo, Japan. It was originally a residence of the Naitō family in the Edo period. Afterwards, it became a garden under the management of the Imperial Household Agency of Japan. It is now a national park under the jurisdiction of the Ministry of the Environment.

      Time on site: 2 hours
    • Ginza

      Chūō (中央区, Chūō-ku, "Central Ward") is a special ward that forms part of the heart of Tokyo, Japan. The ward refers to itself in English as Chūō City. It was formed in 1947 as a merger of Kyobashi and Nihonbashi wards following Tokyo City's transformation into Tokyo Metropolis. Chūō-ku, as a combination of Kyobashi and Nihonbashi, is the core of Shitamachi, the original downtown center of Edo-Tokyo. Literally meaning "Central Ward", it is historically the main commercial center of Tokyo, although Shinjuku has risen to challenge it since the end of World War II. The most famous district in Chūō is Ginza, built on the site of a former silver mint from which it takes its name. The gold mint, or Kinza (金座), formerly occupied the site of the present-day Bank of Japan headquarters building, also in Chūō. As of May 1, 2015, the ward has an estimated resident population of 141,454, and a population density of 13,850 persons per km2. The total area is 10.21 km2. However, because of the concentration of businesses, offices and retail space, the daytime population swells to an estimated 650,000.

      Time on site: 2 hours
    • Tokyo Metropolitan Government Building

      Time on site: an hour
    • Tsukiji Market

      Chūō (中央区, Chūō-ku, "Central Ward") is a special ward that forms part of the heart of Tokyo, Japan. The ward refers to itself in English as Chūō City. It was formed in 1947 as a merger of Kyobashi and Nihonbashi wards following Tokyo City's transformation into Tokyo Metropolis. Chūō-ku, as a combination of Kyobashi and Nihonbashi, is the core of Shitamachi, the original downtown center of Edo-Tokyo. Literally meaning "Central Ward", it is historically the main commercial center of Tokyo, although Shinjuku has risen to challenge it since the end of World War II. The most famous district in Chūō is Ginza, built on the site of a former silver mint from which it takes its name. The gold mint, or Kinza (金座), formerly occupied the site of the present-day Bank of Japan headquarters building, also in Chūō. As of May 1, 2015, the ward has an estimated resident population of 141,454, and a population density of 13,850 persons per km2. The total area is 10.21 km2. However, because of the concentration of businesses, offices and retail space, the daytime population swells to an estimated 650,000.

      Time on site: 2 hours
    • Shibuya Crossing Intersection

      Time on site: an hour
    • Sumida River

      Time on site: 2 hours
    • Imperial Palace

      Chiyoda (千代田区, Chiyoda-ku, "Thousand Generations Rice Field") is a special ward located in central Tokyo, Japan. In English, it is called Chiyoda City.It was formed in 1947 as a merger of Kanda and Kōjimachi wards following Tokyo City's transformation into Tokyo Metropolis. The modern Chiyoda ward exhibits contrasting Shitamachi and Yamanote geographical and cultural division. The Kanda area is in the core of Shitamachi, the original commercial center of Edo-Tokyo. On the other hand, the western part of the Kōjimachi area typically represents a Yamanote district. Chiyoda consists of the Imperial Palace and a surrounding radius of about a kilometer. As of May 2015, the ward has an estimated population of 54,462, and a population density of 4,670 people per km², making it by far the least populated of the special wards. The total area is 11.66 km², of which the Imperial Palace, Hibiya Park, National Museum of Modern Art, and Yasukuni Shrine take up approximately 2.6 km², or 22% of the total area. Often called the "political center" of the country, Chiyoda, literally meaning "field of a thousand generations", inherited the name from the Chiyoda Castle (the other name for Edo Castle, today's Imperial Palace). With the seat of the Emperor in the Imperial Palace at the ward's center, many government institutions, such as the National Diet, Prime Minister's Official Residence, and Supreme Court, are also located in Chiyoda, as are Tokyo landmarks such as Yasukuni Shrine, Tokyo Station, and the Budokan. Akihabara, a district known for being an otaku cultural center and a shopping district for computer goods, is also located in Chiyoda, as are fifteen embassies.

      Time on site: 2 hours
    • Ueno Onshi Park

      Ueno Park (上野公園, Ueno Kōen) is a spacious public park in the Ueno district of Taitō, Tokyo, Japan. The park was established in 1873 on lands formerly belonging to the temple of Kan'ei-ji. Amongst the country's first public parks, it was founded following the western example as part of the borrowing and assimilation of international practices that characterizes the early Meiji period. The home of a number of major museums, Ueno Park is also celebrated in spring for its cherry blossoms and hanami. In recent times the park and its attractions have drawn over ten million visitors a year, making it Japan's most popular city park.

      Time on site: 3 hours
    • Tokyo Skytree

      Time on site: an hour
    • Takeshita Street

      Time on site: 2 hours
    • Sensō-ji

      Sensō-ji (金龍山浅草寺, Kinryū-zan Sensō-ji) is an ancient Buddhist temple located in Asakusa, Tokyo, Japan. It is Tokyo's oldest temple, and one of its most significant. Formerly associated with the Tendai sect of Buddhism, it became independent after World War II. Adjacent to the temple is a five-story pagoda, Shinto shrine, the Asakusa Shrine, as well as many shops with traditional goods in the Nakamise-dōriThe Sensoji Kannon temple is dedicated to Kannon Bosatsu, the Bodhisattva of compassion, and is the most widely visited spiritual site in the world with over 30 million visitors annually.It ranks among the top 10 temples in Japan for the number of visitors in the new year.

      Time on site: 2 hours
    • Akihabara

      Akihabara (Japanese: 秋葉原) is a common name for the area around Akihabara Station in the Chiyoda ward of Tokyo, Japan. Administratively, the area called Akihabara mainly belongs to the Sotokanda (外神田) and Kanda-Sakumachō districts in Chiyoda. There exists an administrative district called Akihabara in the Taitō ward further north of Akihabara Station, but it is not the place people generally refer to as Akihabara. The name Akihabara is a shortening of Akibagahara (秋葉が原, "autumn leaf field"), which ultimately comes from Akiba (秋葉), named after a fire-controlling deity of a firefighting shrine built after the area was destroyed by a fire in 1869.Akihabara gained the nickname Akihabara Electric Town (秋葉原電気街, Akihabara Denki Gai) shortly after World War II for being a major shopping center for household electronic goods and the post-war black market. Nowadays, Akihabara is considered by many to be an otaku cultural center and a shopping district for video games, anime, manga, and computer goods. Icons from popular anime and manga are displayed prominently on the shops in the area, and numerous maid cafés are found throughout the district.

      Time on site: 2 hours
    • Tokyo Stock Exchange

      Time on site: an hour
    • Mori Art Museum

      Roppongi Hills Mori Tower (六本木ヒルズ森タワー, Roppongi Hiruzu Mori Tawā) is a 54-story mixed-use skyscraper located in Roppongi, Minato, Tokyo. Completed in 2003 and named for builder Minoru Mori, it is the centerpiece of the Roppongi Hills urban development. It is currently the sixth-tallest building in Tokyo at 238 meters (781 ft). The tower has a floor space area of 379,408m squared (4,083,910 sq ft), making it one of the largest buildings in the world by this measure. The Mori Tower building is primarily used for office space, but it also includes retail stores, restaurants and other tourist attractions. The Mori Art Museum is located on the 53rd floor and visitors can view the city from observation decks on the 52nd and 54th floors. The headquarters of Mori Building Company are located in this building.In 2004, a six-year-old boy was killed in one of the building's revolving doors. After a police investigation, three men were convicted of professional negligence that resulted in the boy's death. Later, an elevator fire in the building prompted nationwide elevator inspections.

      Time on site: an hour
    • Roppongi

      Roppongi (六本木, literally "six trees") is a district of Minato, Tokyo, Japan, famous for the affluent Roppongi Hills development area and popular night club scene. A few foreign embassies are located near Roppongi, and the night life is popular with locals and foreigners alike. It is in the central part of Tokyo, south of Akasaka and north of Azabu.

      Time on site: 3 hours
    • Odaiba

      Odaiba (お台場) is a large artificial island in Tokyo Bay, Japan, across the Rainbow Bridge from central Tokyo. It was initially built for defensive purposes in the 1850s, dramatically expanded during the late 20th century as a seaport district, and has developed since the 1990s as a major commercial, residential and leisure area. Odaiba, along with Minato Mirai 21 in Yokohama, is among a few manmade seashores in Tokyo Bay where the waterfront is accessible, and not blocked by industry and harbor areas. For artificial sand beaches in the bay, Sea Park in Kanazawa-ku is suitable for swimming, Odaiba has one, and there are two in Kasai Rinkai Park area looking over to the Tokyo Disneyland.Daiba (台場) formally refers to one district of the island development in Minato Ward. Shintaro Ishihara used Odaiba to refer to the entire Tokyo Waterfront Secondary City Center (東京臨海副都心, Tōkyō Rinkai Fukutoshin) which includes the Ariake and Aomi districts of Kōtō Ward and the Higashi-Yashio district of Shinagawa Ward.

      Time on site: 8 hours
    • Nezu-jinja shrine

      Nezu Shrine (根津神社, Nezu-jinja) is a Shinto shrine located in the Bunkyō ward of Tokyo, Japan. Established in 1705, it is one of the oldest places of worship in the city, and several of the buildings on the shrine grounds have been designated as Important Cultural Property. It was built in the Ishi-no-ma-zukuri style of Shinto architecture, following the Tōshō-gū shrine in Nikkō. It is famous for its Azalea Festival (Tsutsuji Matsuri) which is held on its grounds from early April until early May, and it has been described as "Tokyo’s most beautiful shrine" and as one the city's "most spectacular spring scenes".It is one of the Tokyo Ten Shrines (東京十社, Tokyo Jissha).

      Time on site: an hour
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