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Where do you want to visit in Warsaw

    • WITH KIDS (7)

    • Museum of Praga

      Muzeum Warszawskiej Pragi is a museum in Warsaw, Poland. It was established in 2006. It is located in historic buildings at Targowa 50/52, one of which, Krzyżanowski’s House is the oldest brick built house in the Praga suburb, dating back to the 18th century. The museum is a branch of the Museum of Warsaw.

      an hour
    • Rejsy Po Wiśle sp. z o.o.

      an hour
    • Łazienki Park

      Łazienki Park (Polish: Park Łazienkowski or Łazienki Królewskie: "Baths Park" or "Royal Baths"; also rendered "Royal Baths Park") is the largest park in Warsaw, Poland, occupying 76 hectares of the city center. The park-and-palace complex lies in Warsaw's central district (Śródmieście) on Ujazdów Avenue, which is part of the "Royal Route" linking the Royal Castle with Wilanów Palace to the south. North of Łazienki Park, on the other side of Agrykola Street, stands Ujazdów Castle. Originally designed in the 17th century as a baths park (hence the name) for nobleman Stanisław Herakliusz Lubomirski, in the 18th century Łazienki was transformed by Poland's King Stanisław August into a setting for palaces, villas, classicist follies, and monuments. In 1918 it was officially designated a public park. Łazienki is visited by tourists from all over Poland and the world, and serves as a venue for music, the arts, and culture. The park is also home to peacocks and a large number of squirrels.

      2 hours
    • Copernicus Science Centre

      Copernicus Science Centre (Polish: Centrum Nauki Kopernik) is a science museum standing on the bank of the Vistula River in Warsaw, Poland. It contains over 450 interactive exhibits that enable visitors to single-handedly carry out experiments and discover the laws of science for themselves. The Centre is the largest institution of its type in Poland and one of the most advanced in Europe. In 2015 it has been visited by over 5 million people since its opening. The first module of the Centre building was opened on 5 November 2010 with five galleries (On the move, Humans and the environment, Roots of civilization, Lightzone, Bzzz!); the exhibit for teenagers – RE: generation was opened 3 March 2011; a planetarium The Heavens of Copernicus opened on 19 June, the Discovery Park on 15 July, chemistry laboratory - 18 October; biology laboratory - 15 November, robotics workshop - 6 December, and physics laboratory - 20 December. Since 2008, the Copernicus Science Centre together with Polish Radio has organized the Science Picnic - Europe's largest outdoor science-popularization event. In 2011 the Centre hosted the ECSITE conference (European Network of Science Centres and Museums) – one of the most important events in the field of science centres and museums in the world.

      4 hours
    • Warsaw

      Warsaw (; Polish: Warszawa [varˈʂava] ( listen); see also other names) is the capital and largest city of Poland. The metropolis stands on the Vistula River in east-central Poland and its population is officially estimated at 1.760 million residents within a greater metropolitan area of 3.101 million residents, which makes Warsaw the 9th most-populous capital city in the European Union. The city limits cover 516.9 square kilometres (199.6 sq mi), while the metropolitan area covers 6,100.43 square kilometres (2,355.39 sq mi). Warsaw is an alpha global city, a major international tourist destination and a significant cultural, political and economic hub. With a nominal GDP of $233 billion (PPP), it is the wealthiest capital city in Central and Eastern Europe alongside Berlin. Moreover, its historical Old Town was designated a UNESCO World Heritage Site. Once described as Paris of the East, Warsaw was believed to be one of the most beautiful cities in the world until World War II. The German invasion in 1939, the massacre of the Jewish population and deportations to concentration camps led to the uprising in the Warsaw ghetto in 1943 and to the major and devastating Warsaw Uprising between August and October 1944. Warsaw gained the new title of a Phoenix City because of its extensive history and complete reconstruction after the severe damage it suffered in World War II, which left over 85% of its buildings in ruins. On 9 November 1939, the city was awarded Poland's highest military decoration for heroism, the Virtuti Militari, during the Siege of Warsaw. Warsaw is one of Europe’s most dynamic metropolitan cities. In 2012 the Economist Intelligence Unit ranked Warsaw as the 32nd most liveable city in the world. In 2017 the city came 4th in the “Business-friendly” category and 8th in “Human capital and life style”. It was also ranked as one of the most liveable cities in Central and Eastern Europe. The city is a significant centre of research and development, BPO, ITO, as well as of the Polish media industry. The Warsaw Stock Exchange is the largest and most important in Central and Eastern Europe. Frontex, the European Union agency for external border security, has its headquarters in Warsaw. Together with Frankfurt, London and Paris, Warsaw is also one of the cities with the highest number of skyscrapers in the European Union. The city is the seat of the Polish Academy of Sciences, Warsaw National Philharmonic Orchestra, University of Warsaw and the Great Theatre—National Opera, the largest of its kind in the world. The picturesque Old Town of Warsaw, which represents examples of nearly every European architectural style and historical period, was listed as a World Heritage Site by UNESCO in 1980. Other main architectural attractions include the Castle Square with the Royal Castle and the iconic King Sigismund's Column, St. John's Cathedral, Main Market Square, palaces, churches and mansions all displaying a richness of colour and detail. Warsaw is renowned for its bars, restaurants, art galleries and, most notably, several dozen museums and outspread greenery, with around a quarter of the city's area occupied by parks.

      3 hours
    • Tomb of the Unknown Soldier (Warsaw)

      The Tomb of the Unknown Soldier (Polish: Grób Nieznanego Żołnierza) is a monument in Warsaw, Poland, dedicated to the unknown soldiers who have given their lives for Poland. It is one of many such national tombs of unknowns that were erected after World War I, and the most important such monument in Poland. The monument, located at Piłsudski Square, is the only surviving part of the Saxon Palace that occupied the spot until World War II. Since 2 November 1925 the tomb houses the unidentified body of a young soldier who fell during the Defence of Lwów. Since then, earth from numerous battlefields where Polish soldiers have fought has been added to the urns housed in the surviving pillars of the Saxon Palace. The Tomb is constantly lit by an eternal flame and assisted by a guard post by the Representative Company of the Polish Army. It is there that most official military commemorations take place in Poland and where foreign representatives lay wreaths when visiting Poland. The changing of the guard takes place on the hour of every hour daily and this happens 365 days a year.

      30 minutes
    • National Museum of Ethnography

      Państwowe Muzeum Etnograficzne w Warszawie is a museum of ethnography in Warsaw, Poland. It was established in 1888.

      3 hours
    • SIGHTSEEING (15)

    • Castle Square, Warsaw

      Warsaw's Castle Square (Polish: plac Zamkowy w Warszawie) is a historic square in front of the Royal Castle – the former official residence of Polish monarchs – located in Warsaw, Poland. It is a popular meeting place for tourists and locals. The Square (in a more or less triangular shape) features the landmark Sigismund's Column to the south-west, and is surrounded by historic townhouses. It marks the beginning of the bustling Royal Route extending to the south.

      an hour
    • Royal Castle, Warsaw

      The Royal Castle in Warsaw (Polish: Zamek Królewski w Warszawie) is a castle residency that formerly served throughout the centuries as the official residence of the Polish monarchs. It is located in the Castle Square, at the entrance to the Warsaw Old Town. The personal offices of the king and the administrative offices of the Royal Court of Poland were located there from the sixteenth century until the Partitions of Poland. Initially the complex served as the residence of the Dukes of Masovia, and since the sixteenth century, the seat of the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth: the King and Parliament (Chamber of Deputies and Senate). In its long history the Royal Castle was repeatedly plundered and devastated by the invading Swedish, Brandenburgian, Prussian and Tsarist armies. The Constitution of 3 May 1791, the first of its type in Europe and the world's second-oldest codified national constitution after the 1789 U.S. Constitution, was drafted here by the Four-Year Sejm. In the 19th century, after the collapse of the November Uprising, it was used as an administrative centre by the Tsar and was re-designed for the needs of the Imperial Russian administration. During the course of World War I it was the residence of the German Governor-General. In 1920-1922 the Royal Castle was the seat of the Polish Head of State and between 1926 and World War II the building was the residence of the Polish president, Ignacy Mościcki. Burned and looted by the Nazi Germans following the Invasion of Poland in 1939 and almost completely destroyed in 1944 after the failed Warsaw Uprising, the Castle was completely rebuilt and reconstructed; in 1965 the surviving fragments of the castle and the Royal Library, the adjacent Copper-Roof Palace and the Kubicki Arcades were registered as historical monuments by the government. Reconstruction of the castle carried out in 1971-1984 was led by the Civic Committee, responsible for the reconstruction of Warsaw. It was afforded by mainly US donations. In 1980, the Royal Castle, together with the Old Town was registered as a protected UNESCO World Heritage Site. Today it is a historical and national monument, and is listed as a national museum visited by over 500,000 people every year. The Royal Castle, due to its iconic appearance and its long history, is one of Warsaw's most recognizable landmarks.

      2 hours
    • Palace of Culture and Science

      Palace of Culture and Science (Polish: Pałac Kultury i Nauki; abbreviated PKiN) is a notable high-rise building in Warsaw, Poland. Constructed in 1955, it is the center for various companies, public institutions and cultural activities such as concerts, cinemas, theaters, libraries, sports clubs, universities, scientific institutions and authorities of the Polish Academy of Sciences. Motivated by Polish historicism and American art deco high-rise buildings, the PKiN was designed by Soviet architect Lev Rudnev in "Seven Sisters" style and is informally referred to as the Eighth Sister. The Palace of Culture and Science is the tallest building in Poland, the eighth-tallest building in the European Union and one of the tallest on the European continent. It is 237 metres (778 ft) tall, including the structural 43-metre-high (141 ft) spire.

      an hour
    • Warsaw University Library

      Warsaw University Library (Polish: Biblioteka Uniwersytecka w Warszawie, BUW) is a library of the University of Warsaw, Poland. The library was founded in 1816, linguist Samuel Linde became its first director. The library initially housed mostly theological and historical books, the collection was however enlarged by papers from other scientific fields in 1825. In 1831 the library, which served as a public library at that time, already housed 134,000 volumes of books, stored in Kazimierzowski Palace. After the fall of the November Uprising the same year, the institution had been closed, and most of the collection taken away by Russian authorities to Saint Petersburg. In the 1860s the collection numbered 260,000 book volumes. The collection was growing constantly, and a much needed new building was constructed in 1891-1894 at Krakowskie Przedmieście. Before the outbreak of World War I the collection had grown to 610,000 volumes. During the war some of the most precious books and manuscripts were taken away to Rostov-on-Don by fleeing tsarist authorities. After the 1921 Treaty of Riga, most of the works were returned to Poland. During World War II part of the collection was damaged by fire. In the 1990s a selection procedure for a new building was initiated. A design by architects Marek Budzyński and Zbigniew Badowski was chosen, and the new library building was opened on 15 December 1999. Six months before, on 11 June 1999, the building was blessed by Pope John Paul II. The distinct new building includes a botanical garden, located on the roof. The garden designed by landscape architect Irena Bajerska, has an area of one hectare, and is one of the largest roof gardens in Europe. It is freely accessible not only to the academia, but also to the public. The main facade on the Dobra Street side contains large blocks of classical texts in various scripts, including the Old Polish text of Jan Kochanowski, Classical Greek text by Plato and Hebrew script from the Book of Ezekiel.

      2 hours
    • Kościół Akademicki św. Anny

      an hour
    • Barbacane

      30 minutes
    • Presidential Palace, Warsaw

      The Presidential Palace (in Polish, Pałac Prezydencki; also known as Pałac Koniecpolskich, Lubomirskich, Radziwiłłów, and Pałac Namiestnikowski) in Warsaw, Poland, is the elegant classicist latest version of a building that has stood on the Krakowskie Przedmieście site since 1643. Over the years, it has been rebuilt and remodeled many times. For its first 175 years, the palace was the private property of several aristocratic families. In 1791 it hosted the authors and advocates of the Constitution of May 3, 1791. It was in 1818 that the palace began its ongoing career as a governmental structure, when it became the seat of the Viceroy of the Polish (Congress) Kingdom under Russian occupation (Namiestnik of the Kingdom of Poland). Following Poland's resurrection after World War I, in 1918, the building was taken over by the newly reconstituted Polish authorities and became the seat of the Council of Ministers. During World War II, it served the country's German occupiers as a Deutsches Haus and survived intact the 1944 Warsaw Uprising. After the war, it resumed its function as seat of the Polish Council of Ministers.

      2 hours
    • Warsaw Old Town

      The Warsaw Old Town () is the oldest part of the capital city. It is bounded by the Wybrzeże Gdańskie, along with the bank of Vistula river, Grodzka, Mostowa and Podwale Streets. It is one of the most prominent tourist attractions in Warsaw. The heart of the area is the Old Town Market Place, rich in restaurants, cafés and shops. Surrounding streets feature medieval architecture such as the city walls, the Barbican and St. John's Cathedral.

      2 hours
    • National Stadium, Warsaw

      The PGE Narodowy (official name since 2015) or National Stadium (Polish: Stadion Narodowy [ˈstadjɔn narɔˈdɔvɨ]) is a retractable roof football stadium located in Warsaw, Poland. It is used mostly for football matches and it is the home stadium of Poland national football team. The stadium has a seating capacity of 58,145 which makes it the largest association football arena in Poland. Its construction started in 2008 and finished in November 2011. It is located on the site of the former 10th-Anniversary Stadium, on Aleja Zieleniecka in Praga Południe district, near the city center. The stadium has a retractable PVC roof which unfolds from a nest on a spire suspended above the centre of the pitch. The retractable roof is inspired by the cable-supported unfolding system of Commerzbank-Arena in Frankfurt, Germany, and is similar to the newly renovated roof of BC Place in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. The stadium is also very similar to the Arena Națională in Bucharest in terms of age, capacity and the roof. The National Stadium hosted the opening match (a group match), the 2 group matches, a quarterfinal, and the semifinal of the UEFA Euro 2012, co-hosted by Poland and Ukraine. The stadium is equipped with a heated pitch, training pitch, façade lighting, and underground parking. It is a multipurpose venue able to host sporting events, concerts, cultural events, and conferences. The official stadium opening took place on 19 January 2012, and the first football match was played on 29 February 2012. The match between the Polish national football team and the Portuguese team ended with a 0–0 draw. The stadium hosted the 2014–15 UEFA Europa League final.

      an hour
    • Grand Theatre, Warsaw

      The Grand Theatre in Warsaw (Polish: Teatr Wielki w Warszawie) or the Great Theatre—National Opera (Polish: Teatr Wielki—Opera Narodowa) is a theatre complex, opera company, and home of the Polish National Ballet, located on historic Theatre Square in Warsaw, Poland. The Warsaw Grand Theatre is one of the largest theatres in Europe and in the world, with a seating capacity of over 2000. The Theatre was inaugurated on 24 February 1833 with a production of Rossini's The Barber of Seville. After the building's bombing and near-complete destruction in World War II, it was rebuilt and reopened on 19 November 1965 after having been closed for over twenty years.

      2 hours
    • Próżna

      an hour
    • Krakowskie Przedmieście

      Krakowskie Przedmieście (Polish pronunciation: [kraˈkɔfskʲɛ pʂɛdˈmjɛɕt͡ɕɛ], literally: Kraków suburb; French: Faubourg de Cracovie) is one of the best known and most prestigious streets of Poland's capital, surrounded by historic palaces, churches and manor-houses. Krakowskie Przedmieście Royal Avenue constitutes the northernmost part of Warsaw's Royal Route, and links the Old Town and Royal Castle (at Castle Square) with some of the most notable institutions in Warsaw, including – proceeding southward – the Presidential Palace, Warsaw University, and the Polish Academy of Sciences headquartered in the Staszic Palace. The immediate southward extension of Krakowskie Przedmieście along the Royal Route is ulica Nowy Świat (New World Street). Several other Polish cities also have streets named Krakowskie Przedmieście. In Lublin, it is the main and most elegant street. Other cities include Piotrków Trybunalski, Bochnia, Krasnystaw, Olkusz, Sieradz and Wieluń.

      an hour
    • Wilanów Palace

      Wilanów Palace or Wilanowski Palace (Polish: pałac w Wilanowie, Polish pronunciation: [ˈpawat͡s vvilaˈnɔvjɛ]) is a royal palace located in the Wilanów district, Warsaw. Wilanów Palace survived Poland's partitions and both World Wars, and so serves as a reminder of the culture of the Polish state as it was before the misfortunes of the 18th century. It is one of Poland's most important monuments. The Palace's museum, established in 1805, is a repository of the country's royal and artistic heritage. The palace and park in Wilanów hosts cultural events and concerts, including Summer Royal Concerts in the Rose Garden and the International Summer Early Music Academy. The palace, together with other elements of Warsaw Old Town, is one of Poland's official national Historic Monuments (Pomnik historii), as designated September 16, 1994. Its listing is maintained by the National Heritage Board of Poland. Since 2006, the palace has been a member of the international association of European Royal Residences.

      2 hours
    • Nowy Świat Street

      Ulica Nowy Świat (Polish pronunciation: [uˈlit͡sa ˈnɔvɨ ˈɕfjat], New World Street) is one of the main historic thoroughfares of Warsaw. It comprises part of the Royal Route (Trakt królewski) that runs from Warsaw's Royal Castle and Old Town, south to King John III Sobieski's 17th-century royal residence at Wilanów.

      an hour
    • Łazienki Palace

      The Łazienki Palace ([waˈʑɛŋki], Polish: pałac Łazienkowski; in English, the Baths Palace; also called the Palace on the Water and the Palace on the Isle) is a classicist palace in Warsaw's Royal Baths Park, the city's largest park, occupying over 76 hectares of the city center. From 1674 the property (and the nearby Ujazdów Castle) belonged to Count Stanisław Herakliusz Lubomirski, who built a Baroque bath house called "Łazienka" ("Bath") The building, erected on a square plan, was richly decorated with stuccos, statues, and paintings; some of the original decorations and architectural details survive. In 1766 King Stanisław August Poniatowski purchased the estate and converted the bathing pavilion into a classicist summer residence. During World War II, the occupying Germans drilled holes in the palace walls in preparation for blowing it up. They never got around to carrying out the planned destruction.

      30 minutes
    • MUSEUMS AND CULTURE (7)

    • National Museum, Warsaw

      The National Museum in Warsaw (Polish: Muzeum Narodowe w Warszawie), popularly abbreviated as MNW, is a national museum in Warsaw, one of the largest museums in Poland and the largest in the capital. It comprises a rich collection of ancient art (Egyptian, Greek, Roman), counting about 11,000 pieces, an extensive gallery of Polish painting since the 16th century and a collection of foreign painting (Italian, French, Flemish, Dutch, German and Russian) including some paintings from Adolf Hitler's private collection, ceded to the Museum by the American authorities in post-war Germany. The museum is also home to numismatic collections, a gallery of applied arts and a department of oriental art, with the largest collection of Chinese art in Poland, comprising some 5,000 objects. The Museum boasts the Faras Gallery with Europe's largest collection of Nubian Christian art and the Gallery of Medieval Art with artefacts from all regions historically associated with Poland, supplemented by selected works created in other regions of Europe.

      2 hours
    • Warsaw Uprising Museum

      The Warsaw Uprising Museum (named Warsaw Rising Museum, Polish: Muzeum Powstania Warszawskiego), in the Wola district of Warsaw, Poland, is dedicated to the Warsaw Uprising of 1944. The institution of the museum was established in 1983, but no construction work took place for many years. It opened on July 31, 2004, marking the 60th anniversary of the uprising. The museum sponsors research into the history of the uprising, and the history and possessions of the Polish Underground State. It collects and maintains hundreds of artifacts — ranging from weapons used by the insurgents to love letters — to present a full picture of the people involved. The museum's stated goals include the creation of an archive of historical information on the uprising and the recording of the stories and memories of living participants. Its director is Jan Ołdakowski, with historian Dariusz Gawin from the Polish Academy of Sciences as his deputy. The museum is a member organisation of the Platform of European Memory and Conscience.

      3 hours
    • POLIN Museum of the History of Polish Jews

      POLIN Museum of the History of Polish Jews (Polish: Muzeum Historii Żydów Polskich) is a museum on the site of the former Warsaw Ghetto. The Hebrew word Polin in the museum's name means, in English, either "Poland" or "rest here" and is related to a legend on the arrival of the first Jews in Poland. The cornerstone was laid in 2007, and the museum was first opened on April 19, 2013. The museum's Core Exhibition opened in October 2014. The museum features a multimedia narrative exhibition about the living Jewish community that flourished in Poland for a thousand years up to the Holocaust. The building, a postmodern structure in glass, copper, and concrete, was designed by Finnish architects Rainer Mahlamäki and Ilmari Lahdelma.

      3 hours
    • Fryderyk Chopin Museum

      The Fryderyk Chopin Museum (Polish: 'Muzeum Fryderyka Chopina') is a museum in Warsaw, Poland, established in 1954 and dedicated to Polish composer Frédéric Chopin. The museum has two branches: Birthplace of Frédéric Chopin, at Żelazowa Wola; and Chopin Family Parlor, on Krakowskie Przedmieście, Warsaw.

      2 hours
    • Zachęta

      The Zachęta National Gallery of Art (Polish: Narodowa Galeria Sztuki), is a contemporary art museum in the centre of Warsaw, Poland. The main aim of the gallery is to present and support Polish contemporary art and artists. With numerous temporary exhibitions of well known foreign artists, the gallery has also established itself internationally. The Polish term, zachęta, can be translated as encouragement or motivation and refers to the Towarzystwo Zachęty do Sztuk Pięknych (Society for the Encouragement of Fine Arts) founded in Warsaw in 1860.

      2 hours
    • Muzeum Czar PRL

      an hour
    • Varso Vie

      2 hours
    • GASTRONOMY (22)

    • Nolita Restaurant

      2 hours
    • Restauracja Wilcza 50

      2 hours
    • Restauracja Stary Dom

      2 hours
    • Ganesh Ursynów

      2 hours
    • Dekant WineBar & Restaurant

      2 hours
    • Amber Room

      2 hours
    • Senses Restaurant - Private Dining in Warsaw

      2 hours
    • Restauracja Z57

      2 hours
    • Szklarnia

      2 hours
    • Bierhalle Brewery - Restaurant

      2 hours
    • Sweetea

      an hour
    • N31 Restaurant&Bar

      2 hours
    • Buddha Indian Restaurant

      2 hours
    • L'enfant terrible

      2 hours
    • Georgia Restaurant

      2 hours
    • Ole! Tapas Steak Restaurant

      2 hours
    • Cesarski Pałac

      2 hours
    • Restauracja Kultura

      2 hours
    • Pikanteria

      2 hours
    • DoWoli Bistro & Cafe

      2 hours
    • Signature

      2 hours
    • Restauracja Oliva

      2 hours
    • NIGHT LIFE AND SHOPPING (2)

    • Złote Tarasy

      The Złote Tarasy (Golden Terraces) is a commercial, office, and entertainment complex in the center of Warsaw, Poland, located next to the Warszawa Centralna railway station between the Jana Pawła II and Emilii Plater streets. It opened on 7 February 2007.

      an hour
    • Arkadia (shopping mall)

      Arkadia in Warsaw, Poland is the largest shopping complex in Central Europe (as of 2007). In total it has 287,000 square metres (3,100,000 sq ft) of space, 230 shops, 25 restaurants, and a movie theater. It is owned and operated by Unibail-Rodamco. Among the stores are: Carrefour, EMPiK, Leroy Merlin, Saturn, Cinema City, Euro RTV AGD, H&M, and Zara. Arkadia opened on 20 October 2004 and was developed by BEG Ingenierie Polska and Cefic Polska. The International Council of Shopping Centers awarded it the best shopping mall project in Poland, Shopping Center of the Year in 2004, and the European Shopping Center Award for best mall in Europe in 2006. It was declared Warsaw's most disabled-friendly building by the Warsaw Without Barriers programme and the NGO Association of Friends of Integration (Stowarzyszenie Przyjaciół Integracji).

      2 hours
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